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Thu, 30 Oct 2014

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Holidays In Sa Coma

Sa Coma Holidays at a Glance

Fulfilling all the wishlist features for a perfect family holiday, Sa Coma is an attractive, modern resort amid the stunning beaches of Majorca's east coast. With a kilometer-wide crescent of golden sand shelving gently into shallow sea, it's a great choice for that first venture abroad with young children, especially when you add in its family-friendly amenities, traffic-free main promenade, and the small safari park nearby. There is no shortage of beautiful sandy beaches and charming towns and villages to explore along the coastline, and an abundance of beautiful scenery to enjoy. Paris Hilton, who owns a holiday home here, allegedly, thinks it is the most beautiful place in the world!

Who goes to Sa Coma?
Sa Coma is very popular with young families and it caters particularly well for visitors from the UK who make up the majority of tourists here. Many of the restaurants and bars are owned by ex-pat Brits who blend an understanding of british tastes with spanish cuisine and customs. Not too noisy at night, and not too quiet either, it's a resort providing a happy-medium of a holiday atmosphere, keeping it up there in popularity and continuing to attract thousands of tourists each year.



Key Facts - Sa Coma

  • LanguageSpanish, Catalan & English
  • CurrencyEuro
  • Dialing Code00 34
  • Flight Duration2 hours (Approx)
  • Distance From Airport65 km
  • Airport Transfer (Taxi)90 mins

Occupying a prime spot on this prettiest of coastlines, Sa Coma is an excellent choice for a spanish sunshine break with all the perks and pluses of a purpose built resort. Nonetheless, top on its lists of attractions is the fabulous blue-flag beach of fine, pale sand which dovetails gently with the warm Mediterranean, the sweep of the bay creating a safe enclosure of shallow sea. Here all sorts of water-based activities go on such as wind-surfing, scuba diving and pedalo riding, and relaxation essentials, including sunbeds and parasols, are available for hire. To enjoy the wonderful underwater world magnified through the sparklingly clear sea, take a trip in a glass-bottomed boat around the bay. If you're very lucky, you may even catch sight of a dolphin as it arcs in and out of the water further out to sea.

Behind the beach is a wide promenade which extends all the way northwards to Cala Moreya. It's free of traffic and edged with green lawns, shrubs, palm and pine trees which dapple the walkway with spots of welcome shade from the steady sun. Here you'll find a variety of cafes, bars and restaurants catering for all tastes. Many are british-run and sure to have something to suit even the pickiest tot, but majorcan food is a treat, however, so be sure to sample the local fare, too.

When a break from the beach is called for, a trip to the Auto Safari Park is sure to please little ones, especially when they clamber aboard the little road train which will transport you all around the park, saving your hire car from monkey damage! The nature reserve of Punta de n'Amer is a must see, to take in the spectacular vantage point of the watchtower there for a panoramic view of the coastline. Sports enthusiasts won't feel short-changed by the facilities on offer in Sa Coma, either, with tennis, squash, cycling and horse riding all available, and five golf courses, each with excellent facilities and stunning views within easy reach.

The pretty town and beach at Cala Millor is a short distance south, and can be reached by tram for a lovely day out and a change of scene. It's also the place to head for, for an evening out. When darkness falls in Sa Coma, there's no shortage of places to eat and drink, and plenty of life in local bars and restaurants, all of which will suit young families and older couples perfectly. But for the young set seeking higher octane, late-night partying and wilder times, Cala Millor will oblige with some lively joints. Take a taxi or tram the short ride there and back.

Arta: Just a few kilometers inland from the coast, Arta is the perfect antidote to an overdose of beach life, a refreshingly old, medieval town of stone buildings and narrow streets with a sleepy feel. Crowned with a 14th-century fortress where the panorama is incredible, the town promises a chilled day out browsing the many shops and enjoying some fine dining in its excellent restaurants and cafe-lined squares.

Castell de Capdera: Visit the village of Capdera, 8 kms east of Arta, to see one of the best preserved Moorish fortresses on the island, dating back to the early 14th century.

Caves of Drach: Located near Porto Cristo, are these four spectacular interconnected caves which extend to a depth of 25 metres and are around 2 kms in length. It is believed their formation may date back to the Miocene era. Inside is an underground lake. A visit here culminates in a short performance of classical music by four musicians aboard a boat and it is possible to have a short boat ride on the lake at the end. Also nearby are the Caves of Hams, discovered by Pedro Caldentey in 1905. Less impressive overall, they nonetheless also contain an underground lake, and are noted for their unusual rock formations within. Photography is permitted here, but not in Caves of Drach.

Jumaica Tropical Park: Near to Porto Colom and Porto Cristo is this Majorcan family attraction - 25,000 square metres of tropical gardens and landscapes with many different wild animals and tropical vegetation. It is the only tropical park with a banana plantation in Majorca. The Ca'n Pep Noguera restaurant is part of the complex and specialises in Majorcan and international cuisine.

Marine Life: Enjoy an up-close view of life under water when you take a trip out from the bay in a glass-bottomed boat. See the shoals of sparkly fish dart among the flora and fauna in the warm, clear Mediterranean.

Palma: Bring your flatties and plenty of euros for a day of sightseeing, culture and shopping in the island's capital of Palma. Full of museums and galleries, and with a castle and Gothic Cathedral, there is plenty to occupy the curious tourist. La Seo - the local name for the cathedral - is one of the most magnificent Gothic cathedrals in Europe, and contains an entire history of Mallorcan art from its Gothic and Baroque altarpieces to its famous gold work and additions of Antoni Gaudi, including his magnificent baldachin in the presbytery. Shops are plentiful, too, and if fashion is your bag, don't miss the swanky designer boutiques on the Avinguda Juame III.

Prehistoric Remains at Ses Paisses: Located on the outskirts of Arta, this is one of the best preserved prehistoric sites in the Balearic islands, where talayots - Bronze Age megalithic constructions - can be seen. Round or square, they are made of rough stone surrounding a central space in which a column is constructed to support a ceiling of stone slabs - also the floor of the storey above. They are not thought to have been dwellings, but used for tribal or religious ceremonies, or else for storage and distribution.

Punta de n'Amer Nature Reserve: At the northern end of Sa Coma is the 200-hectare nature reserve of Punta de n'Amer, a peaceful open space between Sa Coma and Cala Millor. It was declared a protected nature reserve in 1985 and is the last vestige of how the entire stretch of coast was before mass tourism took hold. Don't miss the ancient watchtower of Castell de n'Amer - it will take about 45 minutes to walk there from Sa Coma and here you can see a small display of weapons and other historical information about the tower. There is also a bar at the top selling drinks and snacks to be enjoyed with some splendid views of the coastline.

Local Events: From the start of March to the end of october, the Oficines d'Informacio Turistica de Mallorca (OIT) in Avenida de les Palmeres, Sa Coma, is open to provide information about events and activities in the area. However, some regulars on the calendar include:

Fiesta: the first fiesta on Majorca's east coast takes place mid January each year at nearby Sant Llorenc des Cardassar, in celebration of Sant Antoni, the patron saint of beasts of burden and pets. It begins with the lighting of small bonfires surrounded by locals sing traditional songs and roasting island produce. The following day there is a colourful parade culminating in the blessing of the animals.

Sant Llorenc also celebrates the fiesta of Sant Joan Pelos on June 24 each year when a young local man dresses as the saint, accompanied by others dressed as devils, and performs a dance during Mass which is repeated as part of a parade around the town. The patron saint's day at Sant Llorenc falls on August 10 and heralds a week-long event with numerous sporting, musical and other more cultural events. And, on September 8th, is the fiesta of the Mare de Déu Trobada, who, according to legend was found in a field of thistles close to the Church of Nostra Senyora de Bellver.

Cala Millor Tourism Week: An annual event featuring a number of sports competitions, concerts, and a spectacular carnival of colourful floats.

Regata Internacional Bahia de Cala Millor: This takes place during the last 5 days of October each year, a spectacular event which took place in Palma until 1994. It attracts over 50 hot air balloon teams from all over Europe, as well as Kenya and the United States.

Arta: Just a few kilometers inland from the coast, Arta is the perfect antidote to an overdose of beach life, a refreshingly old, medieval town of stone buildings and narrow streets with a sleepy feel. Crowned with a 14th-century fortress where the panorama is incredible, the town promises a chilled day out browsing the many shops and enjoying some fine dining in its excellent restaurants and cafe-lined squares.

Castell de Capdera: Visit the village of Capdera, 8 kms east of Arta, to see one of the best preserved Moorish fortresses on the island, dating back to the early 14th century.

Caves of Drach: Located near Porto Cristo, are these four spectacular interconnected caves which extend to a depth of 25 metres and are around 2 kms in length. It is believed their formation may date back to the Miocene era. Inside is an underground lake. A visit here culminates in a short performance of classical music by four musicians aboard a boat and it is possible to have a short boat ride on the lake at the end. Also nearby are the Caves of Hams, discovered by Pedro Caldentey in 1905. Less impressive overall, they nonetheless also contain an underground lake, and are noted for their unusual rock formations within. Photography is permitted here, but not in Caves of Drach.

Jumaica Tropical Park: Near to Porto Colom and Porto Cristo is this Majorcan family attraction - 25,000 square metres of tropical gardens and landscapes with many different wild animals and tropical vegetation. It is the only tropical park with a banana plantation in Majorca. The Ca'n Pep Noguera restaurant is part of the complex and specialises in Majorcan and international cuisine.

Marine Life: Enjoy an up-close view of life under water when you take a trip out from the bay in a glass-bottomed boat. See the shoals of sparkly fish dart among the flora and fauna in the warm, clear Mediterranean.

Palma: Bring your flatties and plenty of euros for a day of sightseeing, culture and shopping in the island's capital of Palma. Full of museums and galleries, and with a castle and Gothic Cathedral, there is plenty to occupy the curious tourist. La Seo - the local name for the cathedral - is one of the most magnificent Gothic cathedrals in Europe, and contains an entire history of Mallorcan art from its Gothic and Baroque altarpieces to its famous gold work and additions of Antoni Gaudi, including his magnificent baldachin in the presbytery. Shops are plentiful, too, and if fashion is your bag, don't miss the swanky designer boutiques on the Avinguda Juame III.

Prehistoric Remains at Ses Paisses: Located on the outskirts of Arta, this is one of the best preserved prehistoric sites in the Balearic islands, where talayots - Bronze Age megalithic constructions - can be seen. Round or square, they are made of rough stone surrounding a central space in which a column is constructed to support a ceiling of stone slabs - also the floor of the storey above. They are not thought to have been dwellings, but used for tribal or religious ceremonies, or else for storage and distribution.

Punta de n'Amer Nature Reserve: At the northern end of Sa Coma is the 200-hectare nature reserve of Punta de n'Amer, a peaceful open space between Sa Coma and Cala Millor. It was declared a protected nature reserve in 1985 and is the last vestige of how the entire stretch of coast was before mass tourism took hold. Don't miss the ancient watchtower of Castell de n'Amer - it will take about 45 minutes to walk there from Sa Coma and here you can see a small display of weapons and other historical information about the tower. There is also a bar at the top selling drinks and snacks to be enjoyed with some splendid views of the coastline.

Local Events: From the start of March to the end of october, the Oficines d'Informacio Turistica de Mallorca (OIT) in Avenida de les Palmeres, Sa Coma, is open to provide information about events and activities in the area. However, some regulars on the calendar include:

Fiesta: the first fiesta on Majorca's east coast takes place mid January each year at nearby Sant Llorenc des Cardassar, in celebration of Sant Antoni, the patron saint of beasts of burden and pets. It begins with the lighting of small bonfires surrounded by locals sing traditional songs and roasting island produce. The following day there is a colourful parade culminating in the blessing of the animals.

Sant Llorenc also celebrates the fiesta of Sant Joan Pelos on June 24 each year when a young local man dresses as the saint, accompanied by others dressed as devils, and performs a dance during Mass which is repeated as part of a parade around the town. The patron saint's day at Sant Llorenc falls on August 10 and heralds a week-long event with numerous sporting, musical and other more cultural events. And, on September 8th, is the fiesta of the Mare de Déu Trobada, who, according to legend was found in a field of thistles close to the Church of Nostra Senyora de Bellver.

Cala Millor Tourism Week: An annual event featuring a number of sports competitions, concerts, and a spectacular carnival of colourful floats.

Regata Internacional Bahia de Cala Millor: This takes place during the last 5 days of October each year, a spectacular event which took place in Palma until 1994. It attracts over 50 hot air balloon teams from all over Europe, as well as Kenya and the United States.

Auto Safari Zoo: This family attraction is to be found on the outskirts of Sa Coma, heading towards Cala Millor. You can drive around the 4-kilometer circuit or else travel on the miniature train. You'll pass through the monkey enclosure and see giraffes, zebra, elephants, lions, tigers and other big cats, too. If you are without your own transport, the park's courtesy bus makes regular trips from Sa Coma and Cala Millor between 9am and 7pm.

Balloon Rides: Early morning rides in a hot air balloon can be arranged from a site near Manacor.

Rancho Sa Coma Horse Riding: Sa Coma has its own small stables opposite the beach at the edge of the resort. It is very popular with visitors and so it's a good idea to book in advance, especially in high season. Rides to Punta de n'Amer take roughly an hour.

Golf: With five first class courses within easy reach, golfers are spoilt for choice. The courses at Pula and Vall d'Or are the closest to Sa Coma. Capdepera caters for all abilities while the course at Canyamel will suit those who like more of a challenge.

Mini-golf: Golf Paradis is a 54-hole mini golf complex that offers a choice of three different 18-hole courses in beautiful gardens with waterfalls, palm trees, lakes and even a windmill.

Tennis, Squash, Cycling, Go Karting: You will find facilities for all in Sa Coma.

Watersports: From the beach at Sa Coma, you can get involved in a variety of watersports including windsurfing, scuba diving and Pedalos.

La Reserva Water Park: This water park is part of Safari Park Hotel in Sa Coma, but is open to people not staying there, too. Two water flumes and a separate shallow area with smaller water slides for children make it a fun way to pass the day for all the family. There is also a large jacuzzi within the free-form swimming pool, plenty of sunbeds. and a swim-up bar and buffet.

Eating/Drinking During Sa Coma Holidays

Much of what happens after sundown takes place in the hotels of the resort, or in the numerous restaurants. However, Sa Coma has a smattering of bars, their names indicating their British ownership (eg: The Nag's Head or The Fools and Horses Bar). Others are Irish; there's an Australian-owned bar; a sports bar; even one afloat. There is only one disco in Sa Coma, Espace, but in Cala Millor, a little further north is one of the largest and most popular clubs in the area, Palace Q, where a mixture of Spanish and international music is played until sun-up. Among others, you will also find Disco Karussell which first opened in 1965, and which features illusionists and hypnotists along with Caribbean and Brazilian dancers.

You're in for a treat if you like good, wholesome food - this is some of the best in Spain. Making use of fresh, local ingredients, recipes passed down from generation to generation and the influences of a succession of invading nations throughout the centuries, the food is an unadulterated joy. Kicking off with hunks of rye bread and excellent olive oil to dunk it in, chopped tomatoes or other toppings and bowls of fresh olives, you can often find you're feeling full before you even get to the main dish. Rice dishes are a mainstay here, the most traditional for Majorca being arros brut (translating as 'dirty' rice) which is rice cooked with pork, rabbit and vegetables. You'll also find a great paella cooked on the island, though this is a dish originating on the mainland.

Favourite ways to cook fish among the locals include simply grilling, baking encrusted with salt, or in a fish stew. And a heap of steamed shellfish to share will create a memory you'll savour for years. When it comes to meat, don't miss the sobrassada, which is a pork sausage made with paprika. Roast suckling pig, fried lamb and grilled rabbit appear regularly on Majorcan menus too.

It is not that easy to find vegetarian options, as many of the delicious vegetable dishes are cooked with the meat. However, keep an eye out for the locally grown vegetables including aubergines, broad beans, asparagus and more (do try the tumbet, which is a delicious kind of ratatouille) and fruits: figs, apricots and oranges among them. Of course, such traditionally Spanish dishes as tortillas (thick vegetable omelette) and gazpacho (cold garlic and vegetable soup) are easily found.

Sa Coma offers a good choice of places to eat with everything from traditional Majorcan fare to good old british favourites, the ubiquitous fast food giants included. But keep your eyes open for some excellent romantic restaurants such as Grill la Bodega, which is candlelit and offers an extensive range of locally-made wines, or Porxada de Sa Torre in the grounds of the Torre de Canyamel, a 13th-century defence tower of Muslim origin, offering a range of perfectly executed traditional local dishes.

Getting Around on Sa Coma Holidays

Airport transfer: In normal traffic, the journey from Son Sant Joan International airport on the outskirts of Palma should take around 75 mins by car. There are always plenty of taxis outside the airport, which operate on a fixed-price basis. However it does vary slightly according to the number of suitcases, passengers and the hour. They don't have child seats, however, so if you want to transfer by taxi, with young children, you should pre-book your taxi specifying this requirement.

Bicycle: Bicycle hire is available from Moto Sprint, opposite the tourist office, which will supply maps of suggested excursions. Cycle routes are well signposted and this is a great way to enjoy the coastline with all its hidden coves and bays - much of the island is pretty flat.

Bus: Various lines run up and down the coast regularly, though they can be a bit unreliable. If this is your choice of transport, make sure you bring some reading matter and a good sunhat. Buses run to the capital, Palma, four times daily.

Car or motorbike: A popular way to get around Majorca is to hire a car or motorbike; the island lends itself well to touring, and having your own transport gives maximum flexibility and freedom.

Ferry: Boats operate a regular service between Majorca and mainland Spain, Menorca, Ibiza and Formentera in the main holiday season (Easter to late October). In winter, services are reduced, and many stop altogether.

Train: Though there has been discussion about re-establishing the train line between Manacor and Arta, there are currently no trains in the east of Majorca.

Sa Coma Holidays Shopping

Local markets bring a touch of colour to the streets; on Wednesday a market is held in the main square of Avenida las Palmeras adjacent to the Tourist Office in Sa Coma. There is also one on Friday at Son Servera and on Tuesday in Arta. Aside from markets, there is a selection of boutiques selling clothes, jewellery, perfume and sports equipment. Supermarkets carry imports of british goods and there is a hypermarket, Eroski, in Sa Coma.

Holidays in Sa Coma - Beaches

On this amazing stretch of coastline, you are spoilt for choice when it comes to beaches. Here is a but a small selection:

Playa de Sa Coma: A wonderful, wide horseshoe of soft golden sand stretching for 1 km, with a gentle shelf into the sea. The beach has loungers and sunshades and there are plenty of nearby places to eat. Watersports and pedalos are available.

Cala Moreya: In near neighbour, S'Illot is the small, sheltered beach of Cala Moreya, sometimes known as Platja de S'Illot. It has fine white sand, a shallow sea and is backed by a wide pedestrianised promenade lined with places to eat, making it ideal for families with young children.

Cala Millor: One and a half kilometers of pure white sand makes this beach a winner, especially considering the lively resort it fronts. It's a great beach for families as the sand is soft, the sea shallow and the facilities excellent. Great for a day out.

Cala Romantica: A little way south of Sa Coma, Cala Romantica is one of three beautiful sandy beaches - the others are Cala Mandia and Cala Anguila - all within easy reach of each other on foot. A popular destination for boats, the sea is calm, safe and ideal for watersports and diving enthusiasts. Cala Romantica is one of the widest beaches in the area, the sands are lined with sunbeds and parasols in high season and pedalos are up for hire. With toilets, showers, two restaurants and a car park, it is an unsurprisingly popular destination for a family day out.

Cala Mesquida: This beach, north of Sa Coma is backed by sand dunes stretching far inland giving the landscape an unusual desert-like appearance. While not in a resort, there is a large complex which overlooks the beach and a couple of beach bars and restaurants. The sea is crystal clear over a gently shelving bed and a limited range of watersports are available, weather permitting; the sea can be rough, but suits experienced windsurfers.

Cala Varques: A hidden, little-known gem accessed via private, rural property. situated between Portocolom and Porto Cristo. Head towards Porto Cristo for about 150 metres, from the Manacor to Calas de Mallorca road, then take the first lane to the right as far as the barrier, park and continue on foot through a small wood to the pretty, picture-postcard beach. It is surrounded by pine woods spreading back to pine-clad hills and has no facilities, just virgin white sand and crystal clear waters to swim in. In one of the cliffs there is an entrance cavity that leads to over 500 metres of underground caves.

Cala Torta: Near Arta is this natural, hidden beach of soft white sand and beautiful clear sea. Only accessible over rather rough terrain, you will need a sturdy vehicle to get here. It is popular with nudists and is completely undeveloped other than a small beach bar selling snacks. Take your own means of shade.

Weather and climate information

Max Temp CAprMayJunJulAugSepOct
Majorca20242831322823
London13162022211913
Sunshine HoursAprMayJunJulAugSepOct
Majorca71010111086
London5676653


Sun 5 Day Forecast - Sa Coma Holidays

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